The Federalist Papers: No. 81

At about this time in 1788, Alexander Hamilton (a.k.a. Publius) was writing Federalist Paper No. 81. His essay would later appear in a bound volume with other Federalist essays (see below). This paper honestly might leave you rolling your eyes a bit at the current state of affairs. Hamilton is still discussing the judiciary and […]

The Federalist Papers: No. 80

At about this time in 1788, Alexander Hamilton (a.k.a. Publius) was writing Federalist Paper No. 80. His essay would later appear in a bound volume with other Federalist essays (see below). This paper continues Hamilton’s examination of the judiciary. Hamilton begins by noting that there “ought always to be a constitutional method of giving efficacy […]

The Federalist Papers: No. 79

At about this time in 1788, Alexander Hamilton (a.k.a. Publius) was writing Federalist Paper No. 79. His essay would later appear in a bound volume with other Federalist essays (see below). This paper examines the judiciary created by the Constitution. What constitutional provisions will safeguard the independence of judges? In the prior paper, Hamilton defended […]

The Federalist Papers: No. 78

At about this time in 1788, Alexander Hamilton (a.k.a. Publius) was writing Federalist Paper No. 78. His essay would appear in a bound volume with other Federalist essays. The paper examines the judiciary created by the Constitution. Hamilton spends the bulk of his time discussing the tenure of judges as it relates to the nature […]

The Federalist Papers: No. 77

On this day in 1788, Federalist Paper No. 77 is published. Publius wraps up his discussion of the executive power. It’s the last paper that he will write for a while (but see logistical note below). Publius is still addressing the appointment power, which is split between the President’s power to nominate and the Senate’s […]