This Week in History: Independence Day, the Flying Tigers, & Betsy Ross

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest, MeWe, a Facebook Group, and Tumblr, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, July 1

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 2005, U.S. Navy SEAL Lt. Michael P. Murphy engages in an action that would earn him the Medal of Honor. He was the first sailor to receive the Medal since the Vietnam War. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; Instagram

Tuesday, July 2

On this day in 1776, the Continental Congress declared America’s independence! Did you know that this vote actually occurred on July 2, not July 4? “That these United Colonies are,” congressional delegates resolved, “and, of right, ought to be, Free and Independent States; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown . . . .” There would be no more attempts to reconcile with Great Britain. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; Instagram

Wednesday, July 3

On this day in 1942, the Flying Tigers begin their last official mission. The unit formally known as the First American Volunteer Group had been flying for mere months, but its reputation was already one for the ages: In roughly 50 aerial battles, it was never defeated. Perhaps more importantly to some Americans, the Flying Tigers struck the first blow at the Japanese in the wake of Pearl Harbor. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; Instagram

Thursday, July 4

On this day in 1776, the Continental Congress adopts our Declaration of Independence. It had already resolved on July 2 that “these United Colonies are, and, of right, ought to be, Free and Independent States . . . .” Now it formally adopted a written document, too. It took nearly a month to write the Declaration. You may know that Thomas Jefferson was the primary author, but he had help, too. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; Instagram

Friday, July 5

During this summer in 1776, Betsy Ross works as a seamstress and an upholsterer. At least according to legend, she would make the first American flag at the request of George Washington. History remembers her as “Betsy Ross,” but would that seem funny to her? She was widowed multiple times and lived most of her life with other names. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; Instagram

Saturday, July 6

On this day in 1747, a future American hero is born in Scotland. Today, John Paul Jones is known as one of the founders of the American Navy. Back then, he was simply John Paul, a young boy who would be introduced to a life at sea when he was only 13 years old. He had a knack for it—but he also kept getting into trouble. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; Instagram

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Sunday, July 7

On this day in 1797, Tennessee senator William Blount is impeached by the House of Representatives. But Blount was one of the signers of the Constitution! How could matters have degenerated so badly? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; Instagram