This Week in History: The Coinage Act, Richmond captured, & an unsung American heroine

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, April 1

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1932, a future Medal of Honor recipient is born. Master Chief William R. Charette was one of five Navy corpsman to receive the Medal of Honor during the Korean War. He was the only one to survive the experience. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 76: “[T]he mode of appointing the officers of the United States contained in the foregoing clauses, must, when examined, be allowed to be entitled to particular commendation. It is not easy to conceive a plan better calculated than this to promote a judicious choice of men for filling the offices of the Union.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Tuesday, April 2

On this day in 1792, the Coinage Act creates the U.S. Mint and provides for the construction of a new building in Philadelphia. That building was the first federal building to be built under the new U.S. Constitution. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 77: “Does [the structure of the executive] also combine the requisites to safety, in a republican sense, a due dependence on the people, a due responsibility? The answer . . . is satisfactorily deducible from these circumstances; from the election of the President once in four years by persons immediately chosen by the people for that purpose; and from his being at all times liable to impeachment, trial, dismission from office . . . .” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, April 3

On this day in 1865, Union forces capture the City of Richmond. It was the beginning of the end for Robert E. Lee and the Confederate armies. The Union had long set its sights on Richmond, Virginia, the capital of the Confederacy. Despite several attempts, Richmond had never been captured. But when Ulysses S. Grant took command of Union forces in 1864, he changed strategies a bit. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Thursday, April 4

On this day in 1719, an American heroine is born. No books would ever be written about this woman. She would never receive any awards or a pension for her service. She simply did what she could: Mary Draper cooked for the men who were rushing towards Boston in the wake of the “shot heard round the world” at Lexington and Concord. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, April 5

On this day in 1776, the Continental Navy captures the HMS Bolton. The Bolton was the second British ship to be captured in only two days. The episode marked the first time that an American ship had been able to take an armed British ship. What a moment that must have been! If only the Americans could have maintained their momentum. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Saturday, April 6

On this day in 1949, Americans mark the last national observance of Army Day. Did you know that we used to celebrate Army Day on April 6 of each year? April 6 is the anniversary of the day that we entered World War I. How many opportunities we took to reinforce patriotism in those days. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, April 7

During this week in 1913, the 17th Amendment is ratified. For the first time in American history, voters would be able to directly elect their United States Senators. The decision seems like a no-brainer. Shouldn’t the people get to elect their own Senators? Well, maybe not. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr