This Week in History: Andrew Jackson captured, shots at Fort Sumter, Abraham Lincoln shot

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, April 8

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1945, a U.S. soldier engages in an action that would earn him the Medal of Honor. Second Lt. Vernon Baker was lucky to survive the experience! In fact, he probably wouldn’t have survived but for the fact that one of the German grenades thrown his way turned out to be a dud. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, April 9

During this week in 1724, a future signer of the Declaration of Independence is born in Connecticut. Lyman Hall may have had the oddest path of anyone to his historic vote for independence. When he first showed up at the Continental Congress, he didn’t technically represent *any* colony. He’d been sent by only a small portion of Georgia. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Wednesday, April 10

On this day in 1781, future President Andrew Jackson is captured by the British. He was only 14 years old. His older brother Robert was also captured. Jackson’s childhood, including his imprisonment during the Revolution, no doubt explains the feisty nature of our 7th President. He once said of himself: “I was born for a storm and a calm does not suit me.” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 78: “No legislative act, therefore, contrary to the Constitution, can be valid. To deny this, would be to affirm, that . . . the representatives of the people are superior to the people themselves; that men acting by virtue of powers, may do not only what their powers do not authorize, but what they forbid.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, April 11

On this day in 1861, Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard sends a demand to Union Major Robert Anderson: Surrender Fort Sumter! But how had matters come to such a point? At that point in time, the Civil War still had not really started. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, April 12

On this day in 1861, the first shot of the Civil War is fired. Confederate and Union forces had been at a stalemate in South Carolina. The federal government needed to resupply Fort Sumter, but it could not do so without treading into Confederate territory. The Confederacy viewed such federal movements as a sign of aggression and as a challenge to its sovereignty. Matters came to a head when Lincoln decided to send an unarmed resupply convoy to the state. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Saturday, April 13

During this week in 1991, an American heroine passes away. Why, exactly, was Mary Babnik Brown a hero? The details are uncertain, but one basic fact is undisputed: Mary got a haircut—and it helped the war effort. Was Mary’s hair used to create crosshairs for Norden bombsights? Or was it simply used for meteorological instruments? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, April 14

On this day in 1865, Abraham Lincoln is shot by an assassin. Did you know that Lincoln was shot on Good Friday? April 14 also happened to be Good Friday that year. Unfortunately, as we all know, Lincoln would pass away the next day. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Instagram; Tumblr