This Week in History: West Point founded, Newburgh Conspiracy squashed, & Fort Charlotte won

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, March 11

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1914, Edward Henry “Butch” O’Hare is born. Perhaps you recognize his last name? A big airport in Chicago is named after him. The actual person, of course, was so much more than Chicago O’Hare International. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 67: “The ordinary power of appointment is confined to the President and Senate JOINTLY . . . ; but as it would have been improper to oblige this body to be continually in session for the appointment of officers and as vacancies might happen IN THEIR RECESS, which it might be necessary for the public service to fill without delay, the succeeding clause is evidently intended to authorize the President, SINGLY, to make temporary appointments . . . .” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Tuesday, March 12

On this day in 1776, a public notice appears in Baltimore, Maryland. It beseeches the help of “our humane ladies” in the American cause. The assistance requested was rather mundane. Could the ladies provide “assistance in furnishing us with linen rags and old sheeting, for bandages”? Yet the notice serves as a reminder: The American Revolution depended upon the assistance of women, even if we hear about them less often. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus post:  Federalist Paper No. 68: “THE mode of appointment of the Chief Magistrate of the United States is almost the only part of the system, of any consequence, which has escaped without severe censure . . . . I venture somewhat further, and hesitate not to affirm, that if the manner of it be not perfect, it is at least excellent.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, March 13

On this day in 1780, the British negotiate a surrender of Fort Charlotte to the Spanish governor of Louisiana, Bernardo de Gálvez. Do you know about Gálvez? He’s the guy that Galveston, Texas, is named for. His efforts were vitally important to the American Revolutionary war effort. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Thursday, March 14

During this week in 1802, the United States Military Academy at West Point is founded. The academy has trained some of America’s greatest military minds, including such notables as Douglas MacArthur, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and George S. Patton. Generals on both sides of the Civil War were trained at West Point as well. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 69: “The President of the United States would be an officer elected by the people for FOUR years; the king of Great Britain is a perpetual and HEREDITARY prince. The one would be amenable to personal punishment and disgrace; the person of the other is sacred and inviolable. . . . . What answer shall we give to those who would persuade us that things so unlike resemble each other?” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Friday, March 15

On this day in 1783, George Washington brings the so-called Newburgh Conspiracy to an end. The potential military coup had been festering for a while. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 70: “Taking it for granted, therefore, that all men of sense will agree in the necessity of an energetic executive; it will only remain to inquire, what are the ingredients which constitute this energy—how far can they be combined with those other ingredients which constitute safety in the republican sense? And how far does this combination characterise the plan, which has been reported by the convention?” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, March 16

On this day in 1926, Sergeant Stubby passes away. Stubby wasn’t just any sergeant—he was a dog! He served with the 102nd Infantry, 26th Yankee Division during World War I. Some even claim that he was the “most decorated dog” in that war. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, March 17

On this day in 1776, the British army evacuates Boston. A bedraggled band of colonists had kept the city under siege for nearly a year—ever since the “shot heard ‘round the world” at Lexington Green! What a slap in the face for the powerful British Army. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr