This Week in History: The Boston Massacre, the Battle of the Alamo, & Operation Meetinghouse

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, March 4

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1951, a soldier engages in an action that would initially earn him the Distinguished Service Cross. Many decades later, a congressional review would determine that he should have been awarded the Medal of Honor—and would have been, but for his Jewish heritage. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, March 5

On this day in 1770, the Boston Massacre occurs. Five Bostonians are killed by British soldiers. Others are wounded. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 64: “The power of making treaties is an important one, especially as it relates to war, peace, and commerce; and it should not be delegated but in such a mode, and with such precautions, as will afford the highest security that it will be exercised by men the best qualified for the purpose, and in the manner most conducive to the public good.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, March 6

On this day in 1836, the Battle of the Alamo is fought. Despite a valiant defense by the Texans (then called Texians), the Mexican Army is victorious. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Thursday, March 7

On this day in 1770, a casualty of the Boston Massacre lies in state at Faneuil Hall. Crispus Attucks had been the first to fall during that chaotic event mere days earlier. Some even argue that Attucks was the first casualty of the American Revolution. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 65: “[Impeachment proceedings] will seldom fail to agitate the passions of the whole community, and to divide it into parties more or less friendly or inimical to the accused. In many cases it will connect itself with the pre-existing factions . . . ; and in such cases there will always be the greatest danger that the decision will be regulated more by the comparative strength of parties, than by the real demonstrations of innocence or guilt.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Friday, March 8

On this day in 1817, an American Patriot passes away. Wentworth Cheswell was the grandson of a slave, and yet he lived life as a free man. He was even elected to public office! But there is much more to Cheswell than just his lineage. Most importantly, he was a Patriot who served his country in multiple ways during the American Revolution. Indeed, he held public positions for much of his life. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 66: “The truth is, that in all such cases it is essential to the freedom and to the necessary independence of the deliberations of the body, that the members of it should be exempt from punishment for acts done in a collective capacity; and the security to the society must depend on the care which is taken to confide the trust to proper hands, to make it their interest to execute it with fidelity, and to make it as difficult as possible for them to combine in any interest opposite to that of the public good.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, March 9

On this day in 1945, the United States Army Air Forces launches an unprecedented air raid on Tokyo, Japan. To date, it remains the single deadliest bombing raid in history—worse even than the bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki later that year. Unfortunately, the Japanese government still refused to surrender. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, March 10

On this day in 1967, a United States Air Force pilot risks his life to save his wingman. Captain John R. “Bob” Pardo would try an untested maneuver, using the windshield on his F-4 Phantom to push another plane to safety. The technique would come to be known as “Pardo’s Push. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr