This Week in History: The Battles of Bentonville & Quinton’s Bridge & Patrick Henry’s stirring speech

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, March 18

Medal of Honor Monday! On this day in 1923, a future Medal of Honor recipient is born in Georgia. Air Force Lt. Colonel Joe M. Jackson wasn’t supposed to be operating a C-123 cargo plane like it was a fighter jet, diving in to make quick rescues. Yet that’s exactly what he did. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 71: “To what purpose separate the executive or the judiciary from the legislative, if both the executive and the judiciary are so constituted as to be at the absolute devotion of the legislative? Such a separation must be merely nominal, and incapable of producing the ends for which it was established.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Tuesday, March 19

On this day in 1865, the Battle of Bentonville begins. The three-day battle has been called the Southern Confederacy’s “last hurrah.” However, the conflict ultimately ended with Confederate General Joseph Johnston’s army in retreat. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 72: “There are few men who would not feel much less zeal in the discharge of a duty when they were conscious that the advantages of the station with which it was connected must be relinquished at a determinate period, than when they were permitted to entertain a hope of OBTAINING, by MERITING, a continuance of them.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, March 20

On this day in 1734, Thomas McKean is born. He was President of the United States before George Washington was! Well, sort of. McKean was a President under the Articles of Confederation, not the U.S. Constitution.But when George Washington won his victory at Yorktown, he reported it to McKean. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Thursday, March 21

During this week in 1778, a contingent of New Jersey militia wins a victory at the Battle of Quinton’s Bridge. Well, sort of. The victory was barely won, and it came at a heavy price. Just a few days later, the British would return to massacre more people, including some pacifist Quakers. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 73: “There are men who could neither be distressed nor won into a sacrifice of their duty; but this stern virtue is the growth of few soils; and in the main it will be found that a power over a man’s support is a power over his will.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Friday, March 22

On this day in 1775, a member of Parliament rises and gives a speech in the British House of Commons. Edmund Burke urged members to reconcile with the American colonies, before it was too late. He spoke of the “anger and violence” that “prevailed every day more and more.” He feared that “things were hastening towards an incurable alienation of our colonies.” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Saturday, March 23

On this day in 1775, Patrick Henry gives a stirring speech. You’ve almost certainly heard of this one! Henry closed the speech with the unforgettable words: “I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, March 24

During this week in 1713, a future signer of the Declaration of Independence is born. Francis Lewis is perhaps best known for his signature on a single document! Yet he would pay dearly for that simple signature. How odd is it that he sacrificed so much, yet most modern Americans have never heard his name? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr