This Week in History: Siege of the Alamo, Gemini 9 & Apollo 9, and the Articles of Confederation

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, February 25

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1969, Airman First Class John Levitow becomes the lowest ranking Air Force member ever to earn a Medal of Honor. He was promptly promoted to Sergeant. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, February 26

On this day in 1836, a group of Texans hold their ground during a siege at the Alamo. That siege and the battle that followed were among the most pivotal events of the Texas Revolution. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 61: “To those who are disposed to consider, as innocent omissions in the State constitutions, what they regard as unpardonable blemishes in the plan of the convention, nothing can be said . . . .” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, February 27

On this day in 1776, a group of Patriots rout Loyalist forces at the Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge. To some, this battle was effectively the “Lexington and Concord of the South” because North Carolina voted for independence from Great Britain not too long afterwards. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 62: “It will be of little avail to the people, that the laws are made by men of their own choice, if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood; if they be repealed or revised before they are promulgated, or undergo such incessant changes that no man, who knows what the law is to-day, can guess what it will be to-morrow.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, February 28

On this day in 1966, two astronauts are tragically killed as they travel from Houston to St. Louis. Elliot See and Charles Bassett were scheduled for two weeks of simulator training at a McDonnell Aircraft facility. They were the prime crew assigned to Gemini 9, slated to launch later that spring. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, March 1

On this day in 1781, the Articles of Confederation are finally ratified by the American colonies. These Articles were effectively our first Constitution. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 63: “[T]here are particular moments in public affairs when the people, stimulated by some irregular passion, or some illicit advantage, or misled by the artful misrepresentations of interested men, may call for measures which they themselves will afterwards be the most ready to lament and condemn.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, March 2

On this day in 1955, a 15-year-old refuses to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Rosa Parks would become famous for the same act of civil disobedience nine months later—but Claudette Colvin did it first. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, March 3

On this day in 1969, Apollo 9 launches into space. It has been called one of the “lost and forgotten missions” in the Apollo program. Such a pity. Without Apollo 9, Apollo 11 never would have gone to the moon in the first place. Apollo 9’s crew was the first to test the lunar module in outer space. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr