This Week in History: Goliad Massacre, President Jackson censured, & George Washington’s step-granddaughter

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, March 25

Medal of Honor Monday! On this day in 1966, an Air Force pilot puts his life on the line for his comrade-in-arms, another pilot who had been downed during a mission. Rescue helicopters were still half an hour away! Bernard Fisher knew what he had to do. He landed his plane on a jungle runway, in the midst of hostile fire. He saved his fellow pilot. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 74: “Humanity and good policy conspire to dictate, that the benign prerogative of pardoning should be as little as possible fettered or embarrassed. The criminal code of every country partakes so much of necessary severity, that without an easy access to exceptions in favor of unfortunate guilt, justice would wear a countenance too sanguinary and cruel.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Tuesday, March 26

On this day in 1777, Dr. Edward Bancroft embarks on a journey to France.  He plans to work as a spy! Bancroft would work directly with Benjamin Franklin, but he would use his position to feed information to the British. Or could he have been a double agent, working for both sides? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Bonus postFederalist Paper No. 75: “The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to commit interests of so delicate and momentous a kind, as those which concern its intercourse with the rest of the world, to the sole disposal of a magistrate created and circumstanced as would be a President of the United States.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, March 27

On this day in 1836, the Goliad Massacre takes place. Most of you have heard “Remember the Alamo!” Did you know that “Remember Goliad!” was another battle cry used by Texans? The events at Goliad occurred just two short weeks after Texans were defeated at the Alamo. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Thursday, March 28

On this day in 1834, President Andrew Jackson is censured by the U.S. Senate. “[W]e should not be at all surprised,” one columnist scoffed at the time, “if he attempted to dissolve the present Congress—at least the Senatorial branch, which, by refusing to register all his imperial edicts, has become extremely offensive to His Majesty!” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, March 29

On this day in 1874, a future First Lady is born. This gifted woman has been overshadowed a bit by her successor, Eleanor Roosevelt. What a pity. You have to wonder if there was anything the talented Lou Hoover couldn’t do! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Saturday, March 30

On this day in 1981, Ronald Reagan is shot by a would-be assassin. The President was then leaving an event at the Washington Hilton Hotel in Washington, D.C. Fortunately, Reagan’s Secret Service detail moved fast! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, March 31

On this day in 1779, Eleanor “Nelly” Parke Custis is born. She has been called the “Daughter of Mount Vernon,” because she was raised by Martha and George after her father passed away. Nelly’s birthday offers an opportunity to get a glimpse into the softer side of General Washington. Nelly was his step-granddaughter. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr