This Week in History: Raid at Cabanatuan, Jackie Robinson, & Groundhog Day

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, January 28

Medal of Honor Monday! During this month in 1930, a future Medal of Honor recipient is born. Charles Kettles was the son of a man who’d served as a pilot in both World Wars. Kettles must have had flying in his genes! He would soon follow in his father’s footsteps, serving in the Korean War, then answering the call to duty when America needed pilots in Vietnam. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, January 29

On this day in 1843, William McKinley is born. He is one of those Presidents that you don’t hear too much about, perhaps in part because his time in office was cut short by a deranged gunman. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 46: “But ambitious encroachments of the federal government, on the authority of the State governments, would not excite the opposition of a single State, or of a few States only. They would be signals of general alarm. Every government would espouse the common cause. A correspondence would be opened. Plans of resistance would be concerted. One spirit would animate and conduct the whole.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, January 30

On this day in 1945, more than 500 American and Allied POWs are liberated from a camp in the Philippines. They’d been held by the Japanese for years and were the last surviving members of what had once been a much larger group. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 47: “The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, selfappointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, January 31

On this day in 1919, a baby boy is born to poor sharecroppers in Georgia. Jack “Jackie” Roosevelt Robinson would go on to become the first black man to play Major League Baseball during the 20th Century. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus Post! On this day in 1879, Congress makes George Washington’s birthday a holiday. As far as the federal government is concerned, there is no such thing as a generic “President’s Day.” Congress specifically decided to celebrate “Washington’s Birthday” on this day so long ago, and it has never reversed the decision. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group

Friday, February 1

On this day in 1781, Americans lose the Battle of Cowan’s Ford. They also suffer a devastating incident at nearby Torrence’s Tavern. It was a low point for the Patriot cause. Nevertheless, you’ll love the patriotic heroine who makes an appearance at the end of the story! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 48: “An ELECTIVE DESPOTISM was not the government we fought for; but one which should not only be founded on free principles, but in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among several bodies of magistracy, as that no one could transcend their legal limits, without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, February 2

On this day in 1887, the first Groundhog Day is celebrated in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. The celebration seems so solidly American, doesn’t it? Yet it actually stems from old traditions carried across the Atlantic centuries ago. American adaptations were made, of course. In Europe, badgers or hedgehogs could be used to predict the weather. But in Pennsylvania, groundhogs were more plentiful. They’d have to do. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 49: “[H]ow are the encroachments of the stronger [branch of overnment] to be prevented, or the wrongs of the weaker to be redressed, without an appeal to the people themselves . . .? There is certainly great force in this reasoning, and it must be allowed to prove that a constitutional road to the decision of the people ought to be marked out and kept open, for certain great and extraordinary occasions.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Sunday, February 3

On this day in 1943, four military chaplains sacrifice their lives when their troop transport ship is struck by a German torpedo. “[A]s I left the ship,” one engineer later said, “I looked back and saw the chaplains . . . with their hands clasped, praying for the boys. They never made any attempt to save themselves, but they did try to save the others. I think their names should be on the list of the Greatest Heroes of this war.” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr