This Week in History: Iwo Jima, Aaron Burr’s plot, & Abraham Lincoln’s escape

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, February 18

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1945, a 17-year-old hits the beaches of Iwo Jima. The next day, Jack Lucas would engage in an action that would make him the youngest recipient of the Medal of Honor since the Civil War. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, February 19

On this day in 1807, former Vice President Aaron Burr is arrested for treason. Less than three years earlier, he had killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel. Perhaps the guy just couldn’t stay out of trouble?! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 57: “[W]hat is to restrain the House of Representatives . . . ? [T]he vigilant and manly spirit which actuates the people of America, a spirit which nourishes freedom, and in return is nourished by it. If this spirit shall ever be so far debased as to tolerate a law not obligatory on the legislature, as well as on the people, the people will be prepared to tolerate any thing but liberty.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, February 20

On this day in 1726, William Prescott is born in Groton, Massachusetts. He is best known for his role in the Battle of Bunker Hill. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 58: “[The House] cannot only refuse, but they alone can propose, the supplies requisite for the support of government. They, in a word, hold the purse . . . . This power over the purse may, in fact, be regarded as the most complete and effectual weapon with which any constitution can arm the immediate representatives of the people, for obtaining a redress of every grievance, and for carrying into effect every just and salutary measure.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, February 21

On this day in 1848, former President John Quincy Adams suffers a stroke while speaking on the floor of the House of Representatives. He passed away a few days later. One suspects that, if Adams could have chosen a way to leave this earth, he would have opted to go in exactly this fashion. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, February 22

On this day in 1980, the “Miracle on Ice” occurs. The United States men’s hockey team defeats the Soviets at the Lake Placid Olympic Games. It was a much-needed morale boost, just when our country needed it most. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 59: “Suppose an article had been introduced into the Constitution, empowering the United States to regulate the elections for the particular States, would any man have hesitated to condemn it, both as an unwarrantable transposition of power, and as a premeditated engine for the destruction of the State governments?” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, February 23

On this day in 1945, United States Marines raise an American flag atop Mount Suribachi, during the bloody Battle of Iwo Jima. FULL STORY: Facebook; FB Group; Instagram

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 60: “The improbability of the attempt may be satisfactorily inferred from this single reflection, that it could never be made without causing an immediate revolt of the great body of the people,—headed and directed by the state governments.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Sunday, February 24

On this day in 1861, President-elect Abraham Lincoln attends church services at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. He’d just escaped a possible assassination attempt! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr