This Week in History: The “Greatest Hero” of WWII, troubles at Valley Forge, & NASA’s remarkable spacewalk

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, February 4

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1934, a future army captain and Medal of Honor recipient is born. Would you believe that Roger Donlon almost wasn’t in the Army at all? He’d originally signed up to be an Air Force pilot, but then ended up in the Army instead. The Air Force’s loss was the Army’s gain! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, February 5

On this day in 1919, Cornelia Fort is born. She would become one of the most accomplished female pilots to serve during World War II. Did you know that an American woman was flying the skies during the attack on Pearl Harbor? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 50: “[I]n the examination of these expedients, I confine myself to their aptitude for ENFORCING the Constitution, by keeping the several departments of power within their due bounds, without particularly considering them as provisions for ALTERING the Constitution itself.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, February 6

On this day in 2011, two American pilots find each other. Decades earlier, Wayne Hague had saved Ron Catton from certain capture—maybe even death—in Vietnam. Nevertheless, the two had never met, and they didn’t know each other’s names. “All this time, it’s been, ‘Gee, I wish I knew who it was [who saved me],’” Catton told a reporter. “Then to have it happen like that. He’s a really nice guy.” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 51: “But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, February 7

On this day in 1778, George Washington and his army endure an unusually bad week at Valley Forge. A snow storm had just started! The entire area was blanketed, and it left the army in pretty bad shape. Wood could not be transported to make fires. Food was already scarce, but now that was worse, too. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, February 8

During this week in 1984, a NASA astronaut makes the first untethered spacewalk. No one had ever done such a thing before! Usually, a long cable keeps astronauts safely bound to their spacecraft. But now Captain Bruce McCandless II would leave the Space Shuttle Challenger and float freely in space, relying only on a propulsion system strapped to his back. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 52: “As it is essential to liberty that the government in general should have a common interest with the people, so it is particularly essential that the [House] should have an immediate dependence on, and an intimate sympathy with, the people. Frequent elections are unquestionably the only policy by which this dependence and sympathy can be effectually secured.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, February 9

During this week in 1779, an unsung Revolutionary War heroine fights gallantly in the Battle of Kettle Creek! Or . . . maybe she didn’t. Nancy Hart’s story is “too good not to tell,” as one historian notes, but it also “seem[s] to hang in a mythical realm somewhere between fiction and history.” Where is the boundary between the real and the mythical Nancy? It’s hard to know, but historians can confirm that she was a real person who really existed. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 53: “[W]ho will pretend that the liberties of the people of America will not be more secure under biennial elections, unalterably fixed by such a Constitution, than those of any other nation would be, where elections were annual, or even more frequent, but subject to alterations by the ordinary power of the government?” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Sunday, February 10

On this day in 1945, USAAF Captain Louis E. Curdes shoots down an American C-47, forcing it to crash land in the ocean. Legend has it that he shot down a plane carrying the woman who would ultimately become his wife! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr