This Week in History: Iran Hostages, Molly Pitcher, & a nuclear scare

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, January 21

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1998, a hero passes away. Jose Calugas served in the Philippine Scouts of the United States Army during World War II. He received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the intense Battle of Bataan. Who would have known that a mess sergeant on kitchen patrol duty would earn a Medal? Heroes come in all shapes and sizes, don’t they? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, January 22

On this day in 1832, Mary Ludwig Hays McCauley, one of the patriotic women behind the folk hero “Molly Pitcher,” dies in Pennsylvania. The story of Molly Pitcher is partly legend, which makes it difficult to tell where the real story ends and the mythology begins. But the legend appears to be based on the stories of two women: Margaret Cochran Corbin and Mary Ludwig Hays McCauley. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 42: “But the most minute provisions become important when they tend to obviate the necessity or the pretext for gradual and unobserved usurpations of power. A list of the cases in which Congress have been betrayed, or forced by the defects of the Confederation, into violations of their chartered authorities, would not a little surprise . . . and would be no inconsiderable argument in favor of the new Constitution.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, January 23

On this day in 1730, a signer of the Declaration of Independence is born in Princeton, New Jersey. Joseph Hewes was born in a Quaker family, which would have made him naturally reluctant to support the need for a war. Nevertheless, he came to the conclusion that a Revolution was inevitable, and he signed the Declaration during the summer of 1776. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 43: “As long, therefore, as the existing republican forms are continued by the States, they are guaranteed by the federal Constitution. Whenever the States may choose to substitute other republican forms, they have a right to do so, and to claim the federal guaranty for the latter. The only restriction imposed on them is, that they shall not exchange republican for antirepublican Constitutions.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, January 24

During this week in 1995, an aide hands a nuclear briefcase to Russian President Boris Yeltsin. Nuclear missiles were ready to go. Would Yeltsin choose to launch them at the United States? He had less than 6 minutes to decide. The world teetered on the brink of nuclear war. Fortunately, the crisis was averted at the last minute. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, January 25

On this day in 1795, General Mad Anthony Wayne writes a letter to Henry Knox. He was livid! He’d just discovered that another American General, James Wilkinson, had been secretly plotting against him, behind his back. At the time, Wayne was commander of a newly created American army, the Legion of the United States. But Wilkinson had wanted that job for himself. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 44: “[W]hat is to be the consequence, in case the Congress shall misconstrue this part of the Constitution, and exercise powers not warranted by its true meaning . . . in the last resort a remedy must be obtained from the people who can, by the election of more faithful representatives, annul the acts of the usurpers.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, January 26

On this day in 1892, Bessie Coleman is born to a poor sharecropping family in Atlanta, Texas. She would later become the first black aviator to receive a license from the renowned Fédération Aéronautique Internationale. Her father was part Cherokee, so she was also the first person of American Indian heritage to achieve that status. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 45: “The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Sunday, January 27

On this day in 1981, Ronald Reagan welcomes the Iran hostages home. Fifty-two hostages had been held in Iran for 444 long days. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr