This Week in History: Hollywood helps during WWII; Aviation hero Glenn L Martin, & President John Tyler

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, January 14

Medal of Honor Monday! During this month in 1945, an Army staff sergeant is killed in an action that would ultimately earn him the Medal of Honor. Curtis F. Shoup was just days away from his 24th birthday at the time of his death. Shoup died while serving with an old friend from high school. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, January 15

On this day in 1862, Edwin Stanton is confirmed as Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of War. He’d been nominated only two days earlier. Stanton would become one of Lincoln’s closest advisors, so perhaps it is unsurprising that he rushed to Lincoln’s side when the President was shot in April 1865. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Wednesday, January 16

On this day in 1942, American film actress Carole Lombard is tragically killed in a plane crash as she returns from a WWII War Bonds tour. Her trip had been part of Hollywood’s early response to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 39: “It is evident that no other form [than a republican government] would be reconcilable with the genius of the people of America; with the fundamental principles of the Revolution; or with that honorable determination which animates every votary of freedom, to rest all our political experiments on the capacity of mankind for self-government.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, January 17

On this day in 1886, Glenn L. Martin is born. He’s possibly the biggest aviation hero that you’ve never heard of. 🙂 He is the “Martin” in Lockheed Martin. He designed America’s first twin-engine bomber. William Boeing was one of his students! His first company merged with one of the Wright Brothers’ enterprises. All of this from a man who began life as a boy, cutting up his mother’s bedsheets so he could make kites and sails. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, January 18

On this day in 1862, former President John Tyler passes away. You probably don’t know too much about Tyler. His presidency was fairly unremarkable—except for the congressional resolution to annex Texas, of course! Having said that, Tyler set one very important precedent: What happens when a President dies in office? It had never happened before Tyler’s term. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 40: “The truth is, that the great principles of the Constitution proposed by the convention may be considered less as absolutely new, than as the expansion of principles which are found in the articles of Confederation.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, January 19

On this day in 2000, Hedy Lamarr passes away. She was a well-known actress—but also a scientist who made a huge contribution to the technological revolution. You rely upon her work every day when you use your cell phone. She’s even been called the “Mother of Wi-Fi.” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 41: “A wise nation will combine all these considerations; and, whilst it does not rashly preclude itself from any resource which may become essential to its safety, will exert all its prudence in diminishing both the necessity and the danger of resorting to one which may be inauspicious to its liberties.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Sunday, January 20

On this day in 1776, British Royal Governor James Wright is arrested by American colonists. The British were surely shocked. Wright had been their most successful Royal Governor, even managing to collect taxes under the much-hated Stamp Act. But even Wright could hold back the revolutionary spirit in his colony for only so long. By 1775, Patriots in Georgia were becoming more and more determined—and more aggressive. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr