This Week in History: Battle of New Orleans, first American balloon flight, & Revolutionary War heroine Mother Bailey

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, January 7

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1968, a United States Army helicopter pilot engages in an action that would ultimately earn him the Medal of Honor. Patrick Henry Brady was an unlikely candidate for the Medal. Surely no one would have expected it? Brady had participated in ROTC during college, but only because he was required to do so. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Tuesday, January 8

On this day in 1815, Americans defeat British forces at the Battle of New Orleans. Did you know that we used to celebrate January 8 as a national holiday, with fireworks and celebrations, just like we do the Fourth of July? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 36: “A small land tax will answer the purpose of the States, and will be their most simple and most fit resource.” MORE: PermalinkFacebook

Wednesday, January 9

On this day in 1793, the first successful balloon flight is made from American soil. Did you know that President George Washington was in the audience for the occasion? He’d been interested in hot air balloons for years. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 29: “Little more can reasonably be aimed at, with respect to the people at large, than to have them properly armed and equipped; and in order to see that this be not neglected, it will be necessary to assemble them once or twice in the course of a year.” FULL STORY: PermalinkFacebook

Thursday, January 10

On this day in 1851, folk hero Anna Warner “Mother” Bailey passes away. She is known for two acts of bravery and patriotism, the first of which occurred when she was almost 23 years old. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Friday, January 11

On this day in 1755, Alexander Hamilton is born. “Few figures in American history,” one of his biographers observes, “have aroused such visceral love or loathing as Alexander Hamilton.” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Bonus quoteFederalist No. 37: “It is impossible for any man of candor to reflect on [the Constitutional Convention] without partaking of the astonishment. It is impossible for the man of pious reflection not to perceive in it a finger of that Almighty hand which has been so frequently and signally extended to our relief in the critical stages of the revolution.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Saturday, January 12

On this day in 1777, Brigadier General Hugh Mercer dies from the wounds that he received at the Battle of Princeton. Do you remember him from the January 3 history post? He was the American officer who refused to surrender, even when he was surrounded by British soldiers. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Bonus quoteFederalist Paper No. 38: “It is a matter both of wonder and regret, that those who raise so many objections against the new Constitution should never call to mind the defects of that which is to be exchanged for it. It is not necessary that the former should be perfect; it is sufficient that the latter is more imperfect.” MORE:  PermalinkFacebook

Sunday, January 13

On this day in 1982, a Boeing 737 crashes into the icy waters of the Potomac. Air Florida Flight 90 had stalled during takeoff, then plowed into Washington D.C.’s 14th Street Bridge before plunging into the river below. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram; Tumblr