This Week in History: USS Reuben James torpedoed, the “Spruce Goose,” & the Stamp Act

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, October 29

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1920, a hero is born in Boise, Idaho. Robert D. Maxwell would go on to serve in World War II, throwing himself on a grenade to save his fellow soldiers. Amazingly, he lived to tell the tale: He just celebrated his 98th birthday last week. Today, Maxwell is the oldest living Medal of Honor recipient. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Tuesday, October 30

On this day in 1775, a force led by Benedict Arnold works to complete a long trek through the Maine wilderness. The journey had nearly done everyone in! Unfortunately, it wasn’t over yet. Do you know about American attempts to seize portions of Canada during the American Revolution? This particular attempt was the brainchild of none other than the audacious Benedict Arnold. Remember: He was a Patriot for years before he married a Loyalist and turned traitor. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Wednesday, October 31

On this day in 1941, USS Reuben James is torpedoed by a German submarine. She would become the first American warship sunk during World War II. But how could that be? Wasn’t America then still neutral? After all, the attack on Pearl Harbor was still weeks away. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Bonus Post! Federalist Paper No. 2: “[I]t is well known that some of the most distinguished members of that Congress, who have been since tried and justly approved for patriotism and abilities, and who have grown old in acquiring political information, were also members of [the Constitutional Convention], and carried into it their accumulated knowledge and experience.” MORE: Permalink; Facebook

Thursday, November 1

On this day in 1765, the Stamp Act goes into effect. That Act was one of the first controversial taxation measures to create a rift between Great Britain and her American colonies in the years before the American Revolution. You’ve heard the battle cry born during those days: “No taxation without representation!” FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Bonus Post! Brutus II: “Those who have governed, have been found in all ages ever active to enlarge their powers and abridge the public liberty. This has induced the people in all countries, where any sense of freedom remained, to fix barriers against the encroachments of their rulers.” MORE: Permalink; Facebook

Friday, November 2

On this day in 1947, the “Spruce Goose” flies for the first and only time. With a wingspan of 320 feet, it remains the largest airplane to ever take to the sky. Did you know that the largest plane ever flown was designed by Howard Hughes? And that it flew decades ago, in 1947? The idea for the seaplane was born during World War II. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Saturday, November 3

On this day in 1793, Stephen F. Austin is born. He would come to be known as the “Father of Texas.” Perhaps there is a twist of irony in that title? When Austin first heard of an opportunity to set up a settlement in Texas, he wasn’t so crazy about the idea. To the contrary, it was Stephen’s father who originally wanted to go to Texas. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Bonus Post! Federalist Paper No. 3: “[I]t is well known that some of the most distinguished members of that Congress, who have been since tried and justly approved for patriotism and abilities, and who have grown old in acquiring political information, were also members of [the Constitutional Convention], and carried into it their accumulated knowledge and experience.” MORE: Permalink; Facebook

Bonus quote! Calvin Coolidge: “If the time comes when our citizens fail to respond to their right and duty . . . intelligently and effectively at the ballot box on election day, I do not know what form of government will be substituted for that which we at present have the opportunity to enjoy . . . .” MORE: Facebook; Instagram

Sunday, November 4

On this day in 1924, Calvin Coolidge is elected President of the United States. He’d won 35 states and 382 electoral votes in the Electoral College, compared to 12 states for the Democratic candidate and a single state for a third-party candidate. The result was unsurprising. Americans loved Coolidge! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram