This Week in History: The Texas Revolution, Apollo 12, and the Battle of Saratoga

Happy Sunday! Attached is a summary of my “morning history” posts from this past week. For those who are interested, links to these posts can now be found on Pinterest and MeWe, too. Enjoy and have a great week!

Monday, October 1

Medal of Honor Monday! During this week in 1942, a United States Coast Guardsman gives his life for a detachment of Marines. Signalman First Class Douglas Munro’s sacrifice would save the lives of hundreds of Marines, including then-Lieutenant Colonel Lewis B. “Chesty” Puller. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Tuesday, October 2

On this day in 1835, the Texas Revolution begins! Did you know that the first battle was fought because Texans decided that the Mexicans would have to pull an old, small cannon out of their cold, dead hands? Does that fact, alone, explain my home state?! FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Wednesday, October 3

On this day in 1789, President George Washington issues his first Thanksgiving Proclamation. Congress had asked him to do so, and he wasted no time in complying with the request. It was something that he had done many times before as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Thursday, October 4

On this day in 1822, a future President of the United States is born. Rutherford B. Hayes’s election would be one for the record books! Would you believe that the 1876 election wasn’t decided until two days before Inauguration Day? It makes the contentious 2000 election look like a picnic. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Friday, October 5

On this day in 1929, a future astronaut is born. Richard “Dick” Gordon, Jr. was aboard Apollo 12 when that spacecraft was struck by lightning. Did you know that one Apollo mission nearly ended in disaster because of a lightning strike? FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+; Instagram

Bonus Post: Centinel I: “[T]he great body of the people never steadily attend to the operations of government, and for want of due information are liable to be imposed on . . . .” MORE: Permalink; Facebook

Saturday, October 6

During this week in 1928, a future Medal of Honor recipient is born in Hawaii. Surely no one expected the quiet Hawaiian to one day earn the Medal of Honor? He wasn’t very social, didn’t drink and always seemed to be reading his Bible. He apparently considered refusing the draft because of concerns about killing other human beings. In the end, though, he decided to serve. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+

Check out my Saturday morning presidential trivia! Facebook

Sunday, October 7

On this day in 1777, the second Battle of Saratoga is fought. The American victory was the beginning of the end for British General John Burgoyne. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated to the world that we could hold our own, even against the powerful British army! We’d earn support from other nations as a result. FULL STORY: Permalink; Facebook; FB Group; Google+

StoryTime Sunday! Thomas Jefferson, the Supreme Court, and Separation of Church and State. FULL STORY: Facebook